The garden charcuterie at Graham Dodds' Wayward Sons.  Photographed on Friday, Dec. 2, 2016.


(Rex C. Curry/Special Contributor)

The garden charcuterie at Graham Dodds' Wayward Sons. Photographed on Friday, Dec. 2, 2016. (Rex C. Curry/Special Contributor)

Special Contributor

Wayward Sons on Greenville Avenue in Dallas closed on Valentine's Day.

Wayward Sons is just one of a string of restaurants on Greenville Avenue in Dallas that has not survived: Remedy, Greenville Bar and Grill and Knuckle Sandwich Co. are a few more.

Graham Dodds pushes the limits of modern Texas cuisine at Wayward Sons in Dallas (3 stars)

"I had hoped we would be a neighborhood staple for the long-term -- a fun and vibrant place that melded Texas cuisine and family favorites while supporting local farmers and artisans," executive chef Graham Dodds said in a statement. 

Restaurant critic Leslie Brenner awarded Wayward Sons three stars in March 2016. Dodds' vegetarian charcuterie board -- a usually meaty dish -- was cleverly made with parsnip, celery root and other vegetables designed to look like meat. (It's pictured at the top of this article. Pretty, right?) 

"All too often, what's served to vegetarians in this town tastes like a punishment," Brenner pointed out. "This tastes like a revelation." She included Dodds' dish in a list of restaurants where vegetarians are treated like royalty.

With the high traffic on Greenville Avenue, including to the nearby Granada Theater in Dallas, the closure of Wayward Sons suggests a problem other than visibility.

Wayward Sons was owned in part by Brandon Hays and Phil Schanbaum, who operate So and So's in Uptown Dallas and High Fives and the Whippersnapper on Henderson Avenue.

Find more food news at guidelive.com/food-and-drink.

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