Oh snap! Eagle Tears beer is brewed by Noble Rey Brewing Co. in Dallas in response to a Pennsylvania beer called Dallas Sucks. 

Oh snap! Eagle Tears beer is brewed by Noble Rey Brewing Co. in Dallas in response to a Pennsylvania beer called Dallas Sucks. 

Noble Rey Brewing Co./Courtesy

Few things get Dallas Cowboys fans riled up like smack talk from followers of the Philadelphia Eagles. That's why when Pennsylvania-based Weyerbacher Brewing released a seasonal beer called Dallas Sucks this football season, the locally-based Noble Rey Brewing Co. knew it had to clap back.

On Tuesday, Noble Rey announced a new brew called Eagle Tears on Facebook, sharing the label image of a sobbing eagle presumably from Philadelphia.

"Tommy, the head brewer, texted me the day the CBS article [about Dallas Sucks] came out and we made quick work of getting a beer formulated and the design done," said Chris Rigoulot, founder of Noble Rey, by messenger. "Our designer, John Rubio, had a design to us within mere hours of calling him."

Eagle Tears is a gose beer clocking 6 percent alcohol content. Gose is a light German style that often features coriander and salt. The beer will be available on draft and in cans to-go at the brewery's onsite taproom beginning Nov. 5, which gives you plenty of time to stock up before the Cowboys play the Eagles on Nov. 19. 

And you'll want to grab some to take home: The can itself says "#phillysucks" and "Don't worry, we won't leave rings on the table."

Dallas Sucks is a pale ale brewed by Easton, Penn. brewery Weyerbacher. Apparently people in Houston have shown interest in it. 

Dallas Sucks is a pale ale brewed by Easton, Penn. brewery Weyerbacher. Apparently people in Houston have shown interest in it. 

Courtesy/Weyerbacher Brewing

When reached Tuesday about the beer, Weyerbacher's chief operating officer, Joshua Lampe, said he couldn't stop laughing about it. When developing Dallas Sucks, which is a pale ale, Lampe tried to contact a couple Dallas breweries about doing something similar, but never heard back, he says.

"I'm really psyched that someone else embraced the spirit of the rivalry and joined in the fun," Lampe said by phone. "We wanted to have the friendly rivalry to show this is all in good fun."

As a show of good faith, Weyerbacher previously promised to donate a portion of the proceeds from Dallas Sucks sales to the Red Cross to help with Hurricane Harvey relief efforts. And next season, locals may even be able to buy the beer -- Lampe says Weyerbacher is hoping to expand distribution into Texas in the next couple months.

"Funny thing is we have a lot of interest in Houston from people that want Dallas Sucks," he said.

Shocking.

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