Jayden Shroff, 3, of Plano, tries out a turntable during Kids Dig, a day of record digging and vinyl education at Josey Records on Oct. 29, 2016, in Dallas.

Jayden Shroff, 3, of Plano, tries out a turntable during Kids Dig, a day of record digging and vinyl education at Josey Records on Oct. 29, 2016, in Dallas.

Ting Shen/The Dallas Morning News

Vinyl stays alive Saturday, Nov. 10, with Kids Dig, an event that teaches children how to appreciate records. 

The third edition is being put on by Too Fresh Productions, Josey Records & Music and Discogs. Kids Dig will be from noon to 4 p.m. at Josey Records (2821 LBJ Freeway, Dallas).

The come-and-go event is free.

Kids Dig

There will be hands-on stations such as ones for record handling and drum machines. Other activities include a record scavenger hunt and some vinyl art stations sponsored by Candelaria & Co. There will also be breakdancing "showcases/battles" and DJ showcases.

"My favorite part of Kids Dig is seeing the kids' curiosity and families interacting at each station," says founder Joel Salazar, the owner of Too Fresh Productions who is also known as DJ Leo J. "I love sharing the passion for vinyl our community has with the next generation."

He will also share his appreciation. Giveaways of items from Josey Records/Discogs will happen throughout the day.

At this event, the grown-ups have just as much fun as the attending children. That includes some of the people there to help, including instructors from the Keep Spinning DJ Academy, other DJs, curators and fans.

And it will be fun for Salazar, too, who says the purpose of Kids Dig is to make records accessible to every fan, no matter the age. He says he got the idea from personal experience, with his daughters who are 5- and 6-years-old.

"They would always see me play vinyl, and whenever they got the chance to put their hand on the record to start to manipulate the sound they would get very excited and happy," he said. "With patience and guidance, I was able to teach them how to do the various tasks of playing a record. I figured most kids don't get to play with records because they are generally looked at as fragile objects that scratch easily. So I wanted to do something bigger to reach more kids and teach them the art of record digging and vinyl education."

For more news, views and reviews, follow @DawnBurkes on Twitter.

What's Happening on GuideLive