April 2003: Ani DiFranco sings and plays her guitar to a  full house at Deep Ellum Live Sunday night in Deep Ellum.

April 2003: Ani DiFranco sings and plays her guitar to a full house at Deep Ellum Live Sunday night in Deep Ellum.

Steve Hebert

One of Dallas' most revered music venues will soon be rocking again. 

The hallowed Deep Ellum Live space is expected to reopen in early 2017, thanks to entrepreneurs Clint and Whitney Barlow. The music minded couple has made a habit of reviving beloved venues, including Trees, which re-debuted in 2009, and the Bomb Factory, which made its legendary return last year.

Do the Barlows just have a soft spot for nostalgia? Perhaps, but that's not the clear-cut reason they're investing in Deep Ellum Live, says Gavin Mulloy, creative director for the Bomb Factory and Trees.

"We're limited by space right now, and days," Mulloy says of not being able to accommodate as many events as companies want to book. Trees and the Bomb Factory are also hugely different in size, so events may not fit one or the the other. Deep Ellum Live hits a "sweet spot," he says.

"It was kind of necessary for us."

Crews just finished demolition on the space, which originally opened in 1991 and hosted everyone Ani DiFranco and Buddy Guy to Green Day and Barenaked Ladies in its heyday. The venue reportedly closed in 2004. As far as details about the new Deep Ellum Live, there are few, Mulloy says. Except ...

"We'll definitely have concerts there," he says.

We've compiled pictures from some of the most memorable performances at Deep Ellum Live throughout the years, to tide you over until 2017:

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