This image released by Lionsgate shows Samuel L. Jackson, right, and Ryan Reynolds in "The Hitman's Bodyguard."

This image released by Lionsgate shows Samuel L. Jackson, right, and Ryan Reynolds in "The Hitman's Bodyguard."

/Lionsgate via AP

It sucks to waste your money and your time on bad movies. Of course, your individual enjoyment is subjective, but here are five films in theaters this week that were panned by critics — either our own or reviewers from elsewhere on the internet.

The Hitman's Bodyguard

If you're just looking for an action/comedy "comfort food" sort of movie, Ryan Reynolds and Samuel L. Jackson may have your back. But if you want more, look elsewhere. The Boston Globe says, "Even by the junk-food standards of summer action comedies, The Hitman's Bodyguard is overlong, over-violent, and over the top."

The Nut Job 2: Nutty by Nature

Newsday says, "Throw in a couple of ugly new characters and one semi-nauseating barf joke, and "The Nut Job 2" marks the emergence of a consistently tone-deaf animated franchise."

The Only Living Boy in New York

The AV Club says, "Thomas' romantic tribulations amount to him whining in gussied-up language about getting friend-zoned, and his view of New York is tedious boilerplate about how the gentrified city has lost its soul."

The Dark Tower

Many skeptics argued that trying to turn Stephen King's epic fantasy series The Dark Tower into a movie was an impossible task. They may have been right. Hollywood Reporter says, "Heaven knows, the books offer more invention than could fit in one feature film, but in their effort to introduce newcomers to this world, the filmmakers make the saga's contents look not archetypal but generic and cobbled together."

The Emoji Movie

TheWrap says The Emoji Movie, "Lacks humor, wit, ideas, visual style, compelling performances, a point of view or any other distinguishing characteristic that would make it anything but a complete waste of your time."

Hollywood Reporter says, "If only this smartphone-centric dud, so happy to hawk real-world apps to its audience, could have done the same in its release strategy -- coming out via Snapchat, where it would vanish shortly after arrival. But even that wouldn't be fast enough."

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