Annie Gray Penuel and Lauren Peck, both of Dallas, wear their makeshift eclipse glasses at Nashville's eclipse viewing party ahead of the solar eclipse at First Tennessee Park on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn.

Annie Gray Penuel and Lauren Peck, both of Dallas, wear their makeshift eclipse glasses at Nashville's eclipse viewing party ahead of the solar eclipse at First Tennessee Park on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn.

Shelley Mays/AP

For the first time since the release of Pokemon Go, Americans everywhere stepped outside their homes to watch the moon cover up the sun for a few minutes.

Then they did their American duty and posted about the 2017 solar eclipse on social media.

We were all excited to stare into that beautiful celestial event, even as people smarter than us warned us to be careful.

But we're not great at listening.

Look, some of us just forgot to buy glasses until they were all sold out, OK?

We were told that wearing multiple pairs of sunglasses wouldn't be enough to protect our eyes, but that didn't stop people from trying.

Some of the folks who had to make their own protective eyewear had the same clever idea for the same funny joke.

Dallas, sadly, only saw a partial eclipse, but we got in on the fun anyway.

Anyone hungry for an official eclipse snack?

Of course, you've gotta be ready for parts of social media to be a bit insufferable for awhile.

And then there's the constant reminder that all good things must come to an end ... in millions of years.

We Americans should remember that people in other parts of the world aren't as lucky as we were today.

There are alternatives, though.

Of course, there is only one group of people you can blame for this thing.

And then there's the moment when the eclipse got weird.

Oh, and Taylor Swift tweeted out a super cryptic video clip, which had a lot of people convinced she was out to steal the moon's thunder with some new music.

And then it was over.

Finally, Star Wars, because Star Wars.

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