Charred gochujang okra shot in the DMN studio by Ryan Michalesko.

Charred gochujang okra shot in the DMN studio by Ryan Michalesko.

Ryan Michalesko/Staff Photographer

A great food photo doesn't merely capture the perfection of a restaurant dish or the gooey goodness of a chocolate chip cookie. It invites us to taste those alluring flavors, take in the aromas and textures, and even experience something of the moment when the photo was shot. A great food photo makes us hungry — to eat, to read, to cook and, if you're like me, to learn, how did they get that incredible shot?

The next Dallas Morning News EatDrinkInsider event will delve into exactly that, in an intensive food photography workshop with three members of our staff. Our director of photography, Marcia Allert, and photographers Ryan Michalesko and Shaban Athuman, will lead a four-hour session, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, March 16, focusing on food photography using a mobile phone.

The class of 15 participants will begin at the downtown Dallas Farmers Market. After a short lesson from the pros, class members will roam the market and shoot dishes, produce, farmers and whatever else catches their eye. Everyone will then walk a few blocks to the Dallas Morning News offices, where Allert and her team will review and discuss everyone's work over lunch.

The day's best shot will run in the Eat Drink D-FW newsletter and on GuideLive's Instagram and Facebook feeds. 

Lamb chops photographed at Tulum restaurant in Dallas

Lamb chops photographed at Tulum restaurant in Dallas

Shaban Athuman/Staff Photographer

You already know Michalesko and Athuman's beautiful work: That luscious ice cream or those singed Brussels sprouts styled and shot in the studio by Michalesko, or the enticing restaurant review images captured at Tulum by Athuman. You might've even caught Michalesko's posts on our Nourish Texas Facebook page, where he's shared his recent experiments fermenting kimchi at home.

Now's your chance to understand the artistry behind images that leap off the screen or the page and compel you to head to the kitchen, or book the restaurant, or just flush with envy over how delicious that photo is. Now your Instagram feed can do that, too.

Details

Tickets are $50 for subscribers and $100 for nonsubscribers, plus tax and fees. Each ticket covers the lecture, workshop and lunch. They are available here.

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