There are a lot of words in the dictionary. I'm typing a bunch of them right now. But sometimes society decides that the words we have won't cut it. We need more words. You know, words like, "hella," because typing the two extra characters in "hell of" is hella hard.

Twitter exchange leads to a unique case of burning a dictionary

Merriam-Webster is here to help. They just added 1,400 new words and 700 new senses of existing terms to their unabridged dictionary, which they say is the "largest, most comprehensive American dictionary currently available in print or online."

Those words include the likes of dox, the internet slang term first used in 2009 that means "to publicly identify or publish private information about (someone) especially as a form of punishment or revenge."

Doxxing sometimes goes hand-in-hand with another new entry, revenge porn (first used in 2007), which is defined as "sexually explicit images of a person posted online without that person's consent especially as a form of revenge or harassment."

Also new are abbreviations like TMI (“too much information”), FOMO (“fear of missing out”) and ICYMI (“in case you missed it.”)

7 hilariously stiff definitions for new dictionary words like 'butt-dial'

But the new entries aren't just things that have cropped up online in the past decade (though, yes, bitcoin is a Merriam-Webster entry now). There are also words like microloan, the first known use of which was in 1988. That's "a small laon typically for financing entrepreneurial projects by impoverished individuals and groups especially in poor or developing regions."

And then there are words that are very relevant to some of today's hottest social and political issues, like cisgender, which (unlike transgender) is "someone whose internal sense of gender corresponds with the sex the person was identified as having at birth." Merriam-Webster notes that the word has been in use since at least 1994, while "transgender" dates back to at least 1970.

What's Happening on GuideLive